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November 14, 2013

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Vaughn Stewart

Kudos to you, EMC and the XtremIO team on the launch. The adoption rate of flash is exceeding everyone's expectations wether the need is for performance or a means to address data center resource constraints (i.e. power & rack space).

I look forward to our healthy debates around technical details but for the moment, Nice Job!

Cheers,
v

Matteovari

Great post Chad! explains well why XtremIO is so unique and the great work EMC is doing

Cris Danci

Great post! Really good to see some transparency at this level.

Sadly, for all it's greatness, flash as a technology has enabled many new entrants into the market at an extremely low cost point. I once heard a wise man say: “A little flash goes along way, imagine what a lot can do” :) Architecturally, a lot of flash allows almost any array (regardless of it's architecture) to perform by today's standards. This is not purely just because flash is fast, but it's because we have not matured in general application development and requirements (most applications are still being developed to deal with the short comings of traditional storage technologies being the bottleneck) and only specific workloads (generally large aggregated ones or poorly designed ones) have flash requirements (again this is why hybrid arrays are a good fit for most workloads). Simply having an array that supports a lot of flash itself does not suggest good design; and realistically when we are talking about performance on scale, is all about good design, the backend will eventually become a problem sooner or later.

My mantra when it comes to performance is “bad design works, good design scales” and as a new generation of applications emerge and workloads characteristics increase the true nature (from a architectural and design perspective) of different flash arrays on the market will become apparent.

I think it was extremely (no pun intended) wise of EMC to spend time on XIO upfront rather than just rushing it to the market. The last thing we need is another ill designed array backended by lots of cheap commodity flash that will work today, but fail to scale tomorrow.

Well done.

conrad walker-simmons

Great post.
From my perspsctive we run allot of great EMC kit here at Sportsdirect in the UK. For us we adopted Extremio early on with four bricks in two node arrays. I can tell you the results have been staggering. Since removing xenapp servers and rds servers from the vnx and vmax and loading them on the XtremIO clusters. We have seen great de-duplication ratios about 5-1 real world on servers and and around 50k iops per array.

All this performance from a disk response time perspective comes in at 0.1ms. So results have been staggering,surprising and were still loading them daily. I expect to hit 100k iops per cluster array within a year hosting around 400 Virtual servers on them.

Hope this has been helpful for those that have yet to experience how ground breaking this is and what it means for farm servers and vdi deployments.

Endre Peterfi

Great to see a customer post this about XtremIO! Tt is indeed a great product but what is more important is that it has the EMC support structure, something that took EMC years to build and all the other AFA startups don't have ...

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